In the prepared remarks to the Senate Intelligence Committee released ahead of the hearing, the former FBI Director James Comey confirmed that President Trump was not under investigation. He also admitted to the problem with leaks of classified information. 

Ahead of the Senate Hearing, the testimony filed by former FBI Director James Comey has been publicly released. What is extremely interesting is that it confirms, among other things that President Trump was not under investigation. Comey testifies that he “briefed the leadership of Congress on exactly which individuals we were investigating and that we had told those Congressional leaders that we were not personally investigating President Trump.”

The memos from the meetings between Comey and President Trump show that they both shared a concern about the problem with leaks of classified information as well as the frustration of the President for not being able to get the information to the public out that he was not personally investigated.

Here are the excerpts from the Comey’s testimony he will present at the Senate hearing.

January 27 Dinner

During the dinner, the President returned to the salacious material I had briefed him about on January 6, and, as he had done previously, expressed his disgust for the allegations and strongly denied them. He said he was considering ordering me to investigate the alleged incident to prove it didn’t happen. I replied that he should give that careful thought because it might create a narrative that we were investigating him personally, which we weren’t, and because it was very difficult to prove a negative. He said he would think about it and asked me to think about it.

February 14 Oval Office Meeting

The President then made a long series of comments about the problem with leaks of classified information – a concern I shared and still share.

March 30 Phone Call

I explained that we had briefed the leadership of Congress on exactly which individuals we were investigating and that we had told those Congressional leaders that we were not personally investigating President Trump.

I reminded him I had previously told him that. He repeatedly told me, “We need to get that fact out.” (I did not tell the President that the FBI and the Department of Justice had been reluctant to make public statements that we did not have an open case on President Trump for a number of reasons, most importantly because it would create a duty to correct, should that change.)

The President went on to say that if there were some “satellite” associates of his who did something wrong, it would be good to find that out, but that he hadn’t done anything wrong and hoped I would find a way to get it out that we weren’t investigating him.

April 11 Phone Call

On the morning of April 11, the President called me and asked what I had done about his request that I “get out” that he is not personally under investigation.

I replied that I had passed his request to the Acting Deputy Attorney General, but I had not heard back. He replied that “the cloud” was getting in the way of his ability to do his job.

He said that perhaps he would have his people reach out to the Acting Deputy Attorney General. I said that was the way his request should be handled. I said the White House Counsel should contact the leadership of DOJ to make the request, which was the traditional channel.

He said he would do that and added, “Because I have been very loyal to you, very loyal; we had that thing you know.” I did not reply or ask him what he meant by “that thing.” I said only that the way to handle it was to have the White House Counsel call the Acting Deputy Attorney General. He said that was what he would do and the call ended.

That was the last time I spoke with President Trump.

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Former FBI Director Comey testifies in Senate hearing on Thursday.

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