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Naked Opinion

Republican Obstructionism on Immigration

republican obstructionism
Republican obstructionism showcases how we are farther way from fixing our broken immigration system, says Jaqueline Villalpa Arroyo

Republican obstructionism showcases how we are farther way from fixing our broken immigration system, says Jaqueline Villalpa Arroyo

On June 23, 2016 Republican obstructionism yet again set us farther away from attempting to fix our broken immigration system with a divided court on the Supreme Court case, Texas v. United States.While the Texas v. United States case focuses on the president’s authority to give executive orders, it simultaneously halts the implementation of Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA). Without DAPA, the nation will, once again, dismiss immigration reform and nothing will be done. The only solutions the Republican Party has suggested in the last sixteen years are mass deportations or acts intended for the exploitation of eligible immigrants. With DAPA we have an opportunity to do things right: relief law abiding immigrants from deportation and deport those who obviously pose a threat to our nation. So, why are we not taking this opportunity?

Republican Obstructionist: Governor Greg Abbott

It has become more evident that Republican obstructionism is not a productive method that promotes better development of the actions Republicans obstruct before they are approved, but is a dismissive response to any proposition made by their political opponents. In simpler words, the Republican Party has become less problem-solution-oriented and more “let’s just make sure the Democrats don’t do anything”-oriented.

Republican Governor Greg Abbott of Texas is an adequate example of this. Abbott sued Obama in 2014 as a response to the implementation of DAPA. He said, “This issue in this lawsuit is not about immigration; the issue in this lawsuit is about abuse of executive power and if this abuse is not stopped it will erode the Constitution that has attracted so many people to this country for generations.” While many of the details in his arguments can be debated upon, his overall point made sense: he is standing up to someone he believes is overreaching.

However, in a more recent interview with conservative talk show host, Laura Ingraham, Abbott made sure to tell us how he really felt: “First of all, that’s why we filed that lawsuit, because we knew the attitude prevailed, that once [undocumented immigrants] get on the DACA or whatever, it’ll be more difficult to remove them. That’s why we filed that lawsuit against the President saying his executive order was illegal, so that people would never begin to even go down the process, of this DACA pathway.

So, Governor Abbott, did you file the lawsuit because you wanted to be the champion of the Constitution, or did you just use that to mask your hypocritical, anti-immigrant views and, therefore, obstruct the only humanitarian solution we have for our broken immigration system?

Republican obstructionism is not leading us anywhere…

At this point, Republican obstructionism has become foolish and irresponsible. The country remains at a halt with its problems because of it. It is understood that there will be disagreements within parties, but what is incomprehensible and unacceptable is the inability of our own leaders to discuss the matters that affect the American people. It is time to deal constructively with the challenges the United States face today.

[Click here to read more on why immigration reform has not been successful in the United States]

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About the author

Jaqueline Villalpa Arroyo

Jaqueline Villalpa Arroyo

Jaqueline Villalpa Arroyo is a Donaghey Scholar at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock where she is pursuing Systems Engineering, French, and Journalism as possible fields of study. Jaqueline is also a 2015 Yale Young Global Scholars Program alumna, where she received the Director’s Award in the Politics, Law and Economics session. Her passions include immigration reform advocacy, political studies, poetry and photography.

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